All indoor programs will be held on the second Thursday of the month. There are no indoor programs in June, July, or August. The social half-hour begins at 7:00 PM; the program at 7:30 PM.

 

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March 2018

Indoor Program – Peter Picone – Songbirds and plants are inextricably linked

March 8 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
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Mr. Peter Picone, DEEP Wildlife Biologist, will share with us his talk centered around insights on creating and enhancing seasonal wildlife habitat. He will describe his experiences in enhancing habitat both on state land and private land. Listeners will come away with several ideas about how to enhance the landscape on both a small and large scale. Integrated into this talk will be Mr. Picone’s videos demonstrating the seasonal food and cover value of Connecticut’s native plants to our diverse bird life.

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April 2018

Indoor Program – John Triana – The New Haven Bird Club at 110

April 12 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
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Members of the New Haven Bird Club are part of an extraordinary group of people dedicated to birds and their conservation. The New Haven Bird Club started in 1907 with a few dozen members, including school teachers, prominent citizens, and high school students. Over the last 110 years, there have been ups and downs. Our history includes some of the biggest names in ornithology, many authors, a pioneer in nature photography, the “Father of the Everglades,” and the beginnings of bird banding in the United States. Ten years have passed since the New Haven Bird Club’s centennial. John Triana, Club Historian and past President will come in to refresh everyone on the Club’s past 110 years.

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May 2018

Annual Banquet – Dr. Richard Prum

May 10 @ 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Amarante's Restaurant,
62 Cove St, New Haven, CT 06512 United States
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In the great halls of science, dogma holds that Darwin’s theory of natural selection explains every branch on the tree of life: which species thrive, which wither away to extinction, and what features each evolves. But can adaptation by natural selection really account for everything we see in nature? Yale University ornithologist Richard Prum—reviving Darwin’s own views—thinks not. Deep in tropical jungles around the world are birds with a dizzying array of appearances and mating displays: Club-winged Manakins who sing with their wings, Great Argus Pheasants who dazzle prospective mates with a four-foot-wide cone of feathers covered in golden 3D spheres, Red-capped Manakins who moonwalk. In thirty years of fieldwork, Prum has seen numerous display traits that seem disconnected from, if not outright contrary to, selection for individual survival. To explain this, he dusts off Darwin’s long-neglected theory of sexual selection in which the act of choosing a mate for purely aesthetic reasons—for the mere pleasure of it—is an independent engine of evolutionary change. Mate choice can drive ornamental traits from the constraints of adaptive evolution, allowing them to grow ever more elaborate. It also sets the stakes for sexual conflict, in which the sexual autonomy of the female evolves in response to male sexual control. Most crucially, this framework provides important insights into the evolution of human sexuality, particularly the ways in which female preferences have changed male bodies, and even maleness itself, through evolutionary time. The Evolution of Beauty presents a unique scientific vision for how nature’s splendor contributes to a more complete understanding of evolution and of ourselves. Richard O. Prum is William Robertson Coe Professor of Ornithology at Yale University, and Head Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. He has conducted field work throughout the world, and has studied fossil theropod dinosaurs in China. He received a MacArthur Fellowship in 2010.

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