All indoor programs will be held on the second Thursday of the month. There are no indoor programs in June, July, or August. The social half-hour begins at 7:00 PM; the program at 7:30 PM.

 

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November 2017

Indoor Program – Dr. Andrea Townsend – How Will Climate Change Affect Warblers?: A Case Study Using Black-throated Blue Warblers

November 9 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
+ Google Map

Dr. Townsend will describe general warbler behavior patterns that have been observed linking climate change to their behavior, fitness, and population trends.  Based on a 25-year mark and recapture study, and using climate data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, she will also specifically present results of her own work with Black-throated Blue Warblers, Setophaga caerulescens. Dr. Townsend and her fellow researchers assessed the effects of spring temperature (i.e., local weather) and the El Niño Southern Oscillation index (a global climate cycle) on the fecundity and population growth of Black-throated Blue Warblers. They found that local and global climatic conditions affected warbler populations in different—and sometimes unexpected—ways.

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December 2017

Indoor Program – Dr. Shary Siksay – Funky Feathered Feet

December 14 @ 7:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
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While most bird talks focus on the obvious – gorgeous plumage, the intricacy of mating calls and dances, and other fascinating aspects of birds’ lives, Dr. Shary Siksay’s lecture will focus on the “funky feathered feet”, going through the morphology, form, and function of avian feet. All types of avian feet will be discussed in terms of their evolution, how they help the species to adapt and survive, and why certain species are susceptible to the specific injuries she sees most often. Time permitting, she will also go through some interesting local and recent cases, including a great horned owl with his head “on upside down” and a poisoned bald eagle.  Dr. Siksay earned her VMD from University of Pennsylvania and works full time as a small animal and exotics veterinarian. Her work includes treating wildlife brought to her by wildlife rehabilitators.

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January 20182018

Indoor Program – Chris Elphick PhD – Special Event: Connecticut Bird Atlas Kick-off

January 4, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
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Due to a full Indoor Program Lecture Schedule, there will be a special session to present the upcoming Connect Bird Atlas Project. The New Haven Bird Club and the state birding community will be called on to conduct surveys for the Connecticut Bird Atlas Project starting in 2018. The project will focus on all birds that breed, winter, or migrate in Connecticut. The scope of the atlas is to understand breeding bird distribution and abundance, to document the changes since the last atlas, to understand wintering distribution of the birds in the state, to identify stopover habitat during migrations, to establish predictive relationships where species occur on the landscape, and to use the results and data to create an interactive website. Such a large effort will yield an abundance of data that could be used by many agencies. The reasons for the project are to contribute meaningful data for the State Action Wildlife Plan, to contribute to conservation planning, and to establish Environment Health Metrics. The last atlas was published in 1994 after years of surveys from 1982 to 1986. This effort was supported by many NHBC members. We hope the members can come out again to support the new effort. Depending on Professor Elphick’s mood, he considers himself a conservation biologist, an applied ecologist, or an ornithologist, with research interests that span behavioral, population, community, and landscape ecology. Most of his research has focused on aquatic species that occur in wetland or agricultural habitats, but he has also worked in tropical forest, the boreal zone, and the open ocean. Despite this breadth, the overriding goal that unites much of his work is to understand how best ecologists can guide management decisions to reconcile the conservation of biological diversity with other human activities. His current research interests involve studies of birds in tidal marshes, studies of birds in agricultural settings, and studies of past and projected avian extinctions. Professor Elphick has spearheaded several statewide atlas projects.

snow date 1/11/17

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February 2018

Indoor Program – Nick Tiberio – History of Falconry

February 8, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
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Nick Tiberio is the Director of Aviculture at the Livingston Ripley Waterfowl Conservancy (LRWC). Nick has over 15 years of professional experience working with avian species, and manages the LRWC flock. In addition to breeding and raising endangered waterfowl species, Nick is a Master Falconer and has worked with a number of birds of prey. Prior to joining the Conservancy, Nick worked as a professional abatement falconer in New York, training and flying a team of abatement falcons to deter pest birds from landfill grounds—an environmentally-friendly approach to pest control. Nick will be speaking on the ancient art of falconry from its early beginnings, to its modern day practice throughout the World.  His talk will include live falconry raptors, along with tools and equipment used in the sport.

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March 2018

Indoor Program – Peter Picone – Songbirds and plants are inextricably linked

March 8, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
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Mr. Peter Picone, DEEP Wildlife Biologist, will share with us his talk centered around insights on creating and enhancing seasonal wildlife habitat. He will describe his experiences in enhancing habitat both on state land and private land. Listeners will come away with several ideas about how to enhance the landscape on both a small and large scale. Integrated into this talk will be Mr. Picone’s videos demonstrating the seasonal food and cover value of Connecticut’s native plants to our diverse bird life.

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April 2018

Indoor Program – John Triana – The New Haven Bird Club at 110

April 12, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whitney Center, Cultural Arts Center,
200 Leeder Hill Drive, Hamden, CT United States
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Members of the New Haven Bird Club are part of an extraordinary group of people dedicated to birds and their conservation. The New Haven Bird Club started in 1907 with a few dozen members, including school teachers, prominent citizens, and high school students. Over the last 110 years, there have been ups and downs. Our history includes some of the biggest names in ornithology, many authors, a pioneer in nature photography, the “Father of the Everglades,” and the beginnings of bird banding in the United States. Ten years have passed since the New Haven Bird Club’s centennial. John Triana, Club Historian and past President will come in to refresh everyone on the Club’s past 110 years.

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May 2018

Annual Banquet – Dr. Richard Prum

May 10, 2018 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Amarante's Restaurant,
62 Cove St, New Haven, CT 06512 United States
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In the great halls of science, dogma holds that Darwin’s theory of natural selection explains every branch on the tree of life: which species thrive, which wither away to extinction, and what features each evolves. But can adaptation by natural selection really account for everything we see in nature?  Yale University ornithologist Richard Prum—reviving Darwin’s own views—thinks not. Deep in tropical jungles around the world are birds with a dizzying array of appearances and mating displays: Club-winged Manakins who sing with their wings, Great Argus Pheasants who dazzle prospective mates with a four-foot-wide cone of feathers covered in golden 3D spheres, Red-capped Manakins who moonwalk. In thirty years of fieldwork, Prum has seen numerous display traits that seem disconnected from, if not outright contrary to, selection for individual survival. To explain this, he dusts off Darwin’s long-neglected theory of sexual selection in which the act of choosing a mate for purely aesthetic reasons—for the mere pleasure of it—is an independent engine of evolutionary change. Mate choice can drive ornamental traits from the constraints of adaptive evolution, allowing them to grow ever more elaborate. It also sets the stakes for sexual conflict, in which the sexual autonomy of the female evolves in response to male sexual control. Most crucially, this framework provides important insights into the evolution of human sexuality, particularly the ways in which female preferences have changed male bodies, and even maleness itself, through evolutionary time. The Evolution of Beauty presents a unique scientific vision for how nature’s splendor contributes to a more complete understanding of evolution and of ourselves. Richard O. Prum is William Robertson Coe Professor of Ornithology at Yale University, and Head Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. He has conducted field work throughout the world, and has studied fossil theropod dinosaurs in China. He received a MacArthur Fellowship in 2010.

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